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SFGTV2
Oct 3, 2012 8:00am PDT
. mission bay is a destination for those who want to make history in by a life sciences and biotech discoveries. -- vio lifbio life scientists ad biotech discoveries. u2 -- for making that a cause for future generations and we will discover in that corridor those live science drugs that will help us end these dreadful diseases for generations to come. thank you, lieutenant governor. [applause] i wanted to welcome the delegates who come here under the leadership of the vice minister and of course in his capacity as not only the vice ministry of commerce, but also the china investment and promotion agencies and to the many companies are here in attendance, you represent that cross-section of companies from diverse backgrounds and discipline throughout the bay area. i want to welcome you here to this great seminar to wish you a great conversation and an intelligent one, and one that hopefully will discuss the many more ways that we can not only do business, but to work together to solve the world's problems. this is what happens here in san francisco. we cannot just talk about the prob
LINKTV
Oct 3, 2012 2:00pm PDT
systematized the science of perspective which was to dominate western pictorial space until the 20th century. in masaccio's fresco of the trinity-- probably constructed with brunelleschi's advice on architecture-- classical columns and a monumental barrel vault frame the figures of christ and god, the father. here is the interaction of painting, architecture, and the mathematical analysis of space that was unique to the florentine renaissance. 1n 1419, brunelleschi had begun the hospital of the innocente. it was the first orphanage in europe to be funded by public donations, and the architecture is a delicate blending of the roman and the romanesque. it was brunelleschi's architecture which the painter fra angelico depicted in his fresco of the annunciation, which awaits you at the top of the stairs of the monastery of san marco. fra angelico lived and worked here, decorating the monastery with scenes from the new testament-- scenes striking for their simplicity and serenity. inside the cells, the world seems to retreat, leaving a single image suspended like a spiritual vision. the b
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:00pm EDT
johnson, the best-selling science writer will talk about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including every name, were good ideas come from an the 2012 release, future perfect. >> host: steven johnson come in your newest book, in a network age, use those term pre-progressive. what is that? >> guest: it is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i see emerging all around me. the book is really people who are trying to change the world in trying to ban progress, but he don't completely fit the existing models that we have between the left in the right or democrats and republicans. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a gover
MSNBC
Oct 8, 2012 11:00pm PDT
he did it here. let's watch. >> it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself. but, look, i think part of that was because, as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney. we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan which is his tax cut. i don't have a tax cut that's $4.8 trillion or $5 trillion. i'm not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a medicare voucher plan. i love teachers, i think we need more of them. i mean, look, don't believe me, speaker gingrich was pretty eloquent in running during the primaries in saying, look, mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> well, one thing i have been saying about the campaign is the president needs surrogates out there, he needs confederates, people out there. i love charleston. a lot of people -- rather charlotte because in charlotte you heard an entire political party speaking led by people like deval patrick, the governor of massachusetts, after you saw mr. mayor. i think it sounds better
CNN
Oct 10, 2012 4:00am EDT
polls over the years, it's not an exact science, it's a snapshot in time. we will see if governor romney can sustain this bounce. the president got one ahead of his convention. it dissipated. romney got one out of the first debate. we'll see if it lasts. this science is not exact but it's pretty darn good. if you look back over time, it's pretty darn good. when you see the conspiracy theories you have to say it's the politics of the moment. every now and then you see a poll that you say well, that doesn't look right. i look at ours every time before we put them on the air and the guys who do it for us do it just right. >> go ahead, gloria. >> anderson, i also think it actually kind of affects the campaign in its own way because as the old saying goes, nothing sticks to you like success so when you have a candidate like mitt romney who has been down, maybe some of his voters are less enthusiastic because they think oh, he might not win. suddenly, he's got the wind at his back. suddenly they're thinking gosh, maybe this guy can win, maybe i ought to turn out and vote. then his base
WETA
Oct 8, 2012 7:00pm EDT
administration. he's now a professor of political science and public policy at duke university. we thank you both for being with us. peter feaver, to you first. we heard governor romney today criticize the president broadly for not rejecting strongly enough america's influence in the world. yet when it came to specifics, we didn't hear many details. so let me just ask you about a couple of different places in the world. what about when it comes to iran. what exactly governor romney be doing differently right now? >> well, this is the criticism that the obama campaign has leveled at the romney campaign for not being detailed and specific enough. when it comes to iran, the president hasn't laid out a red line that he said clearly he would enforce. when asked to be precise about what it means for iran not to possess a nuclear weapon, the articulation of the red line, he's been vague and says he doesn't want to parse it further. i think there's a certain element of ambiguity about where you would draw the line precisely so as to avoid being trapped by it. but the other point to make is that
MSNBC
Oct 9, 2012 7:00pm EDT
reagan and michelle goldberg. >> up next, the rogue's gallery of republicans who don't believe science. wait until you catch this science committee in the house and its membership. this is "hardball," the place for politics. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that means with schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 your portfolio has tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 a better chance to grow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can trade all our etfs online, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 commission-free, from your schwab account. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so let's talk about saving money, tdd#: 1-800-34
ABC
Oct 3, 2012 6:00pm EDT
for me. >> i would love to be in science. right now what we're stud dig is -- studying is phenomenal. love it. >> i think it's important so we have an idea of what we want to do. >> reporter: these students are on the right path of becoming the next bright stars in our community. in abing dean, manny locke. >> great day. we'll be right back. stay with us. >>> doctor, tell us about the differences in academics in the care. >> the principle deference is the focus on bringing the latest advance in science and clinical research to the care of patients. in turns offering them an opportunity to participate where we get the next big idea for how to take care of patients. i think the unique aspects of our care is we're able to answer questions for patients, both today's patients and tomorrow's patients while still providing outstanding care by the specialists available. >> doctor, thank you for joining us. the number, 410-481-2222. thanks so much for answering all of our questions this afternoon. >> you're welcome. thanks for having me. >>> a popular upscale retailer is sending out a three b
SFGTV2
Oct 7, 2012 7:30am PDT
legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it cou
NBC
Oct 8, 2012 7:00pm EDT
chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: for the first time ever, an experimental drug is showing great promise of slowing the alzheimer's disease. >> this is the first time we are seeing a slowing of the cognitive decline in patients with alzheimer's disease in this type of drug treatment. >> reporter: at first, the experimental drug seemed to fail as has every experimental drug to date. but when the manufacturer looked at it more closely, it found those with more mild disease had a less memory loss than those with the placebo, the 71-year-old retired expert still functions well. >> there are things that take a lot longer than they used to because i keep forgetting the order in which things have to be done. >> reporter: the results presented today combined studies with a total of 2,000 patients in the last two months. most scientists say it wouldn't be enough to reach the fda approval. but further studies show that it could help people with early alzheimer's disease. the drug is certainly not the cure that everybody wants, but for al krieger and millions with alzh
SFGTV2
Oct 2, 2012 3:30am PDT
key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
KOFY
Oct 8, 2012 11:30am PDT
pick someone to win and become a spokesperson for what is best about science and biomedical science it would be him. >> reporter: i asked the doctor how he is going to celebrate. he said he's probably going to have a beer. the love for medicine runs in his family, his wife is a dermatologist and their two doctors are both in medical school. amy hollyfield, abc7 news. >>> much more still ahead. developing news in a meningitis outbreak linked to contaminated medicine, the rise in the number of cases. >>> battle between wedding caught on video. the wild fight that ended with the death of one ron: years ago i made a promise to provide the best for my family, in sickness and in health. carol and i needed help figuring out what's covered by medicare and what's not. so we turned to the same folks we've relied on for health insurance all these years. announcer: ron and carol called anthem blue cross and found an affordable medicare plan that pays for some costs original medicare won't. now they can keep making memories for years to come. choose from plans offering protection from high out o
SFGTV2
Oct 3, 2012 9:30pm PDT
was ail algebra, second year laboratory science and third year math. we know this class 2014 right now, 20% of them are on track not to graduate, those with d's or betters, and if we raise that to c's or better, we might be looking at 30 rs. the first graduating class will have to graduate a through g is now entering their junior year. we know they're hitting now -- >> 2014 is the class -- >> the class, right. they will be heading junior year next year. sequentially classes get much more rigorous. and that third year math, which has been a gatekeeper to the students in los angeles will no longer be a gatekeeper to our students too. we could be looking at 40% of our graduating class not getting high school diplomas. now, while i know furlough dres are horrible to everybody, especially horrible to our students but also to our labor partners. we also at the board have a great responsibility to graduate every student ready for cleverages. and actually where we are now, this 2014 and 2015 class, if this is any indication of where we might be in 2014, 2015, we will not be in a good place
CBS
Oct 3, 2012 1:35am EDT
agenda. it's not based on science. >> there's absolutely no biological reason for any human or mammal to drink milk after weaning and certainly the milk of another species. it's completely out of the ordinary and therefore there's really no biological reason to do it. >> reporter: okay, so obviously strong sentiments that is on both sides of this debate, including whether the latest science shows milk helps prevent bone fractures or not. what do you think about milk as a school lunch program? voice your opinion on our wusa 9 facebook page. >> i think it would be tough to put pinto beans on your lucky charms. i'm just saying. >>> we get a lot of mail from viewers. a tv anchor in wisconsin had to speak up after one viewer attacked her for being overweight. jennifer livingston got an e- mail from a man who said her size wasn't a suitable example for the community's young people and the letter went viral after her husband, a fellow anchor, posted it online. she addressed her rude viewer on the air today and anybody else who may be the victim of bullying. >> that man's words mean nothing to m
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00am EDT
ideas on science, had this interesting pattern where they, actually had a lot more kind of failed papers. and they published, they had far more volume to their work, and a huge number of those papers never went anywhere. it was every now and then, there would be one that would be incredible breakout hit and would change science forever, then most of the time they were starting out hitting like baseball a short little ground out whereas the none in -- noninnovative thinkers, who hadn't had disruptive idea, they were just hitting kind of singles and were much more consistent, had higher batting average but weren't swinging for the fences. so the argument is that to really be kind of successful in a new way and open up a new door or possibility in your field or science or some other field you have to have tolerance for failure and error. that is one of the things we see in silicon valley. is that that is if you're an entrepreneur in silicon valley and you haven't had at least one failed startup people look at you strangely. you're supposed to try and miss that means you're taking ris
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30pm EDT
in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getti
Comedy Central
Oct 4, 2012 11:30pm PDT
going to say mad scientist, i'm going to si highly inventive science. >> there we go. >> stephen: are working on. called region sis how synthetic buy only will reinvent nature and ourselves. do we need reinventing? we were invented once by god, the almighty father, maker of heaven and earth. are you playing, god, sir, because you certainly have the beard for it. (applause) just doing my job, right, we're engineers. we're fixing all these things that are broken. >> stephen: about are we broken. we're reinventing ourselves. >> some of us have disease. and some of those actually can be changed by changing our, not only our environment which is one thing we can change, but also our genetics. >> stephen: you can bring things back from the dead? and were you behind mitt romney's performance last night? (laughter) (cheers and applause) >> we can make copies of things that have elements of animals or bacterias, so forth that were extinct. >> stephen: okay so, you are work on the woolly mammoth, right. >> it's a possibility. first thing that is amazing progress in the field is being able to se
NBC
Oct 10, 2012 11:00am PDT
from l.a.x. to the california science museum, an that's proving to be crickty. at the speed of a slow walk. construction workers are laying a carpet of steel plates along the streets to protect underground pipelines. >> the plates will only deflect 1/16th of an inch. >> the journey begins at midnight on friday. >>> the good news is it shouldn't be a real issue. there's no problems with traffic in l.a. coming up, jimmy fallon in the zone. and we have to say, the kid nailed it. we'll have more coming up for you. >>> finally late night talk show host jimmy fallon displayed a little bit of humor. this featured mitt romney as mr. romney's neighborhood. president obama was demoted to a part-time mailman. >> money is sort of like paper you can use to buy things you want. like toys and yachts. you may wonder, where does money come from it comes for a magical place called our parents. now fal lon, the kid knows how to bring fun any. >> and his hair is great, too. it looks just like mr. rogerses. well done. join us tonight. have a great day everybody. >> that's what makes the show so good.
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 5:30pm PDT
science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether this is just a natural deterioration that we should just be
MSNBC
Oct 9, 2012 12:00pm PDT
keep it that way. they had a good chance to take the senate until the kink of junk science opened his month. with the senate in the balance, let's talk about favorite senate races and surely what's going on in missouri never ceases to amuse me. the crazy uncle has been let out of the back room and into the party. he keeps talking and he keeps staying alive. he's only 3 points behind. missourians are saying we don't like either people. who do we like least, best, bad, worse. it's problematic both ways, but the gop has refunded to todd akin to supporting him, newt gingrich has endorsed him, rick santor santorum, i believe you like him, too. >> i do. >> they both endorse him. it seems that the gop once running from todd akin has said winning the senate at all costs is valuable. >> some in the gop, some. >> it's interesting, you know. missouri there's a mirror image situation in massachusetts. missouri is a red state that doesn't really like the republican candidate personally. you look at massachusetts, and another key senate race. this is a blue state that really likes the republican pe
SFGTV2
Oct 3, 2012 5:00am PDT
famous golden gate park. located near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by ta
Comedy Central
Oct 5, 2012 7:00pm PDT
highly inventive science. >> there we go. >> stephen: are working on. called region sis how synthetic buy only will reinvent nature and ourselves. do we need reinventing? we were invented once by god, the almighty father, maker of heaven and earth. are you playing, god, sir, because you certainly have the beard for it. (applause) just doing my job, right, we're engineers. we're fixing all these things that are broken. >> stephen: about are we broken. we're reinventing ourselves. >> some of us have disease. and some of those actually can be changed by changing our, not only our environment which is one thing we can change, but also our genetics. >> stephen: you can bring things back from the dead? and were you behind mitt romney's performance last night? (laughter) (cheers and applause) >> we can make copies of things that have elements of animals or bacterias, so forth that were extinct. >> stephen: okay so, you are work on the woolly mammoth, right. >> it's a possibility. first thing that is amazing progress in the field is being able to sequence the genome of the little broken up bi
SFGTV2
Oct 9, 2012 12:00am PDT
violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides per ye
ABC
Oct 2, 2012 5:00pm PDT
to the dust pin of quackery. >> there is science now we didn't have before. that sexual orientation is not something that can be changed. >> but the victory may be short lived and there are groups that already claim it's unconstitutional violating first amendment. >> this is absolutely clamps down on speech by professionals involved and also affects the minors and their parents rights to access types of therapies they may want. >> legal groups also argue conversion therapy does work for people. >> when this benefits people, and may or may not benefit other people there is no basis for the state to step in. >> this is among the darkest times of my life? >> did it work? >> no. i am just as gay as i ever was. >> other states will be interested in seeing how this case plays out. they, too are considering the ban autos there is a busy weekend ahead. there a look at options this weekend. >> and there is a killer whale in sea world with a injury what. trainers say could have caused this massive wound. >> and this is the rover seeing unusually have you heard of the new dialing procedure for
ABC
Oct 4, 2012 6:00pm PDT
to our request for an interview. >> up next remarkable science behind creating a human heart. >> and there i >>> findings of a study out of uc berkeley are raising concerns about the chemical known as bpa showing mothers with high levels had less active thoi roids and the thyroids of newborn boys were more active. there is no impact found among newborn girls and this is commonly found in other containers and in the lining of food and beverage can autos people understand how easy to break a heart but how about making one? there is a group of researchers developed a blueprint they say could have a profound affect. >> through a microscope there is no mistaking beating. these heart cells were created in a bay area lab and have helped researchers unlock secrets of how a heart becomes a heart it helps to know what switches exist how they're connected and what they turn on or shut off. >> so this team set out to map the genetic switches locked inside of the dna of embryonic stem cells to see how it becomes a hearts cell. >> this is setting right switches to turn genes on or off. >>
SFGTV
Oct 5, 2012 12:00pm PDT
and the future, and more than anything we're a link to the community. and our motto is where science meets community. our team does really cutting edge research on different kinds of prevention strategies, pre-exposure prophylaxis. and if you go to our website, join prep hiv, you'll see all of the many exciting studies that we have as well as our partnership with san francisco city clinic in launching the first demonstration project of pre-exposure prophylaxis, taking antihiv medicines to prevent new infections. we're studying topical gels, retro microbicide. the way we're going to end this epidemic is through a vaccine, we've controlled other infectious diseases through a cure. we're proud of our staff who contribute to this as well as the many study participants. and i'm just going to close with a quick word about the project. the way that this project came about was actually one of our staff members, janey vincent who is our graphic designer, you'll see some of her beautiful work inside, noticed that there was -- she's hiding. (applause) >> she noticed that president obama had des
Current
Oct 8, 2012 4:00pm PDT
committee of science and technology. as would say he's from the tech-mology committee. and you know who else is on that committee? todd akin. all these guys from congress, i got t this is a good one. this is when lucifer burned the dinosaur bones. let's put the dumbest guys on the science and technology committee. if you think that's bad we're just warming up. a book with letters to the edit editor. the constitution of slavery to the black race has long believed to be an abomination upon its people. may actually have been a blessing in disguise. the blacks who could endure those conditions and circumstances would some day be rewarded with citizenship in the greatest nation ever established upon the face of the earth. oh, i don't know why i didn't see it that way? it's a blessing in disguise. why don't you be my slave and you do all my work. if you don't i'll whip you. does that sound like a blessing in disguise? and how hot is your wife? i might want to have sex with her. and what about your daughters. should have i sex with them before i sell them off to a different state. that's what
CNBC
Oct 5, 2012 6:00pm EDT
of sandstorm gold is next. >>> later, smart speculation, as science and technology converge, ground-breaking developments in medicine continue to emerge. cramer's zeroing in on one biotech speck that could be on the verge of a major move. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." got @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer at #madtweets. send an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a s
CNN
Oct 9, 2012 12:00pm EDT
bad news coming out of research by the australian institute of marine sciences that as you pointed out half of the coral in the great barrier reef has declined largely due to both tropical storms, a crown of thorns starfish that feeds on the coral up to 40% declined just from the starfish alone and of course climate change and coral bleaching. >> so storms, starfish, climate change. what can we do to stop the coral loss? >> well, this is some scary news. this is much more than anyone expected. but there is a little bit of a silver lining. we believe the crown of thorns starfish in their larva stages grow faster because of runoff and fertilizer off the coast of australia. so scientists are calling for vehicler controls on that runoff going into the reef which may help to reduce the population of the crown of thorns starfish and hopefully relieve some of the pressure. they believe up to 42% of the decline of the great barrier reef has been caused by extreme outbreaks of these crown of thorns starfish. so hopefully reducing runoff can have a positive impact and allow the reef to recover t
CNN
Oct 5, 2012 2:00am PDT
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "early start." an american astronaut about to hitch a ride with the russians up to the international space station. later this month, nasa's kevin ford will join two russian astronauts aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft that will blast them into orbit for a five-month stay. ford will join the station's current team and take over as expedition commander. this will mark for the second space flight and his first aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft. kevin ford is joining us live now from the cosmonaut training center in star city, russia, where he and his crewmates have been preparing for the mission. thank you for being with us. you will be at that time iss from the end of the month until march of next year. can you tell us what you will be doing while you are there? >> well, i can't tell you exactly what we will be doing but i can tell you what we plan to do. so we -- we hope to carry out a lot of science. we had a lot of training
ABC
Oct 9, 2012 7:00pm EDT
!" introducing today's contestants -- a graduate student of library science from chillicothe, ohio...
FOX News
Oct 7, 2012 7:00pm EDT
board off the table. it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself. >> tonight the anticipation growing, about the one and only debate between the vice-presidential nominee. gas prices may be high in your hometown, but they just hit a record in one state, and keep climbing. could what's driving up the cost in california happen closer to you? and a driver plows right into a liquor store, whoa. imagine being one of the people inside. and watching that struck get away. ♪ >> i'm harris falkner, we begin tonight in florida, with the republican presidential nominee for president spending a third straight day in that state which is up for grabs. governor mitt romney at an earlily in port st. lucie and he has a major address on foreign policy tomorrow at the virginia military institute and then the governor making a promise about taxes. >> a study came out this week that showed with all his spending, and all of his borrowing and all the interest on at that debt, that he will ultimately have to raise taxes on middle inco
Univision
Oct 2, 2012 6:00am EDT
gel. a continuacion la doctora martiza fuentes nos dice mas. . fuse science ha desarrollado productos con avanzada tecnologia pensando en la comodidad del consumidor y en el alivio a coro plazo, un ejemplo de esto es el energel, un gel que produce alivio cuando hay dolor o fatiga muscular y algun tipo de proceso antinflamatorio en las articulaciones. tambien deportistas como tiger woods, big papi david ortiz, el pelotero de las medias rojas de boston jose bautista, nolan carroll de los miami dolphins, entre otros son aficionados del energel. http://www.fusescience. com yy en las tiendas naturistas gnc. hacemos una pausa: y cuando volvamos toda la informacion deportiva.. pero antes un adelanto con el socio!! como les va buenas tardes y buen inicio de semana para todos, fue un fin de semana de mucha actividad deportiva para los equipos del area que en dos disciplinas estan luchando por su clasificacion directa al playoff, y nuestro primer resumen tiene que ver con el iniciamos en el candem yard donde los orioles derrotaron 6-3 a los medias rojas y esperaron una victoria de te
FOX
Oct 4, 2012 4:30am PDT
, political science professors. i think mitt romney did a great job, obama looked a little off his game. i think mitt romney did a better job tonight. >> i think the winner is the president because he is the president and his opponent has to be able to say why he should be better than the incumbent and i don't think that was necessarily done tonight. >> and a debate feels 6 5% feels mitt romney won compared to 2 5% for the president. and 48% for mitt romney, compared to 2 5% for the president. >>> and fact statements you will find that on our website www.ktvu.com. >>> they will replace the death penalty with life in prison without parole. here are the -- here is the news about that. >>> and there is a dispute that happened in the city of glenn cove neighborhood. ktvu channel 2 morning news wopping wong joins us with more about the man accused of opening fire on neighbors. >> he said the sister martin he is a former marine and you can see the marine flag flying out in front of his home. the home of the toe people he shot was vallejo. i want to show you video as the coroner took the two v
Comedy Central
Oct 5, 2012 10:30am PDT
scientist, i'm going to si highly inventive science. >> there we go. >> stephen: are working on. called region sis how synthetic buy only will reinvent nature and ourselves. do we need reinventing? we were invented once by god, the almighty father, maker of heaven and earth. are you playing, god, sir, because you certainly have the beard for it. (applause) just doing my job, right, we're engineers. we're fixing all these things that are broken. >> stephen: about are we broken. we're reinventing ourselves. >> some of us have disease. and some of those actually can be changed by changing our, not only our environment which is one thing we can change, but also our genetics. >> stephen: you can bring things back from the dead? and were you behind mitt romney's performance last night? (laughter) (cheers and applause) >> we can make copies of things that have elements of animals or bacterias, so forth that were extinct. >> stephen: okay so, you are work on the woolly mammoth, right. >> it's a possibility. first thing that is amazing progress in the field is being able to sequence the
FOX Business
Oct 7, 2012 2:00am EDT
like a high school science project throw in the baking soda and soda and right in the taxpayer's face. medicaid and medicare are rising by 17 trillion over 75 years due to health reform. a quarter of the state's budget is toward medicaid . medicaid part of the budget rising x. four times faster. >> mark, even the democratic governors are worried. governor cuomo is saying that he doesn't have all of the cash necessary to set up the exchanges that are part of the whole plan and what are they going to do? these states are strap asked they don have the money? >> this is covered by the federal government. >> oh, yeah, how? >> they said they are going to pay it. >> is money coming down from heaven to pay this? >> they are paying 100 percent. >>> and that's how we worry? >> you are suggesting that you throw the people by the road side and let them die. >> of course not. >> and the facts is that there is a possibility of that? >> people are not dying on the streets . >> not yet. but soon. >> we can survive with our current system and we have if for years. it is going to get in more troub
FOX
Oct 9, 2012 5:30am EDT
what's going on todaa is because oo the two parties."but mileah kromer...who is a political science professor at goucher pollege....says independent vottrs...are still sending a message.(kromer) "what they hhpeeii for a third party candidate, is to rrn and get their ideas out there, ttat hoppfully their ideas will be aaopted by one of the major party candidates."" (mitchell) "i vote for democrats at times, i vote for republicans at times."and according to ""-4"...that hould be the principle...of any p5 news at ttn. n ryyell,,foxx - more ttan 377thouuaad marylanders are registered with the green, libertariin or coming up in our 6 o'cloock hour... a smmll stowaway... gives a beltsville man trouble on the road. road.the strange sight he found... ffer popping the hood. oriolee closer jim johnson comes through for the ttam.thee game winning performance he gave... in the 9tt. ((break 3)) 3 3 the orioles fann patieece second time in two days, the start of the home playoff ggme orioles get their firstthome but it wwsn't easy. wei-yii chen was great, but in the first inning he watched with a
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 5:00pm EDT
no idea they're putting a carcinogen in their bodies. >> i would go back to medical fact and science. according to evidence based medicine. >> this is the world health organization. >> birth control is safe, and it is 90 percent effective. in relation to talking to the 13 and 15 year-old, we believe that is the role of a parent. what we do every single day is encourage parents to have conversations with their children. the vast majority of teenagers in texas want to hear from their parents about their bodies. planned parenthood de amelie teach your but the science. we hope you teach them about the immorality, your gun, and your views on science. again, we believe that all people have the right to scientifically based medically accurate information. [applause] >> hi. i'm laura. catholic wife of one, mother of two. i am here to give probably a different perspective about contraception and i hope to be a voice of a different option for all these beautiful men and women in the audience. i have been married for 20 years . i embrace the gift of the catholic teaching about contraception. th
NBC
Oct 2, 2012 5:00pm EDT
the change for winter 2012. >> it's kind of a science. >> jummy the -- you meet the man behind "wicked" and how they turn the stage into >> discussion impossible tax hike under way and the impact could have on middle-class families. a man dies in police custody and is now being rolled homicide. allegations of illegal gambling and internet cafes. details on the claims being made by the maryl >> the weather channel will begin naming not or the winter storms this upcoming winter season to better communicate the threat and timing of a significant storms' impact. instead of calling things snow- tober or snopocalypse. the list includes athena, brutus, draco, and magnus. >> the most important things to look out will be accumulation and the combination of wind which can produce significant impact on the public. listen differentiate -- this will differentiate the system they will be using. tom tasselmyer? >> "bob's on teh way." we start talking about snowstorms three weeks in advance. >> brutus is coming! >> e tu? [laughter] >> pretty soon we will be naming rain storms. i don't know. >> we will
Comedy Central
Oct 5, 2012 1:30am PDT
going to si highly inventive science. >> there we go. >> stephen: are working on. called region sis how synthetic buy only will reinvent nature and ourselves. do we need reinventing? we were invented once by god, the almighty father, maker of heaven and earth. are you playing, god, sir, because you certainly have the beard for it. (applause) just doing my job, right, we're engineers. we're fixing all these things that are broken. >> stephen: about are we broken. we're reinventing ourselves. >> some of us have disease. and some of those actually can be changed by changing our, not only our environment which is one thing we can change, but also our genetics. >> stephen: you can bring things back from the dead? and were you behind mitt romney's performance last night? (laughter) (cheers and applause) >> we can make copies of things that have elements of animals or bacterias, so forth that were extinct. >> stephen: okay so, you are work on the woolly mammoth, right. >> it's a possibility. first thing that is amazing progress in the field is being able to sequence the genome of the littl
Comedy Central
Oct 8, 2012 7:00pm PDT
highly inventive science. >> there we go. >> stephen: are working on. called region sis how synthetic buy only will reinvent nature and ourselves. do we need reinventing? we were invented once by god, the almighty father, maker of heaven and earth. are you playing, god, sir, because you certainly have the beard for it. (applause) just doing my job, right, we're engineers. we're fixing all these things that are broken. >> stephen: about are we broken. we're reinventing ourselves. >> some of us have disease. and some of those actually can be changed by changing our, not only our environment which is one thing we can change, but also our genetics. >> stephen: you can bring things back from the dead? and were you behind mitt romney's performance last night? (laughter) (cheers and applause) >> we can make copies of things that have elements of animals or bacterias, so forth that were extinct. >> stephen: okay so, you are work on the woolly mammoth, right. >> it's a possibility. first thing that is amazing progress in the field is being able to sequence the genome of the little br
CW
Oct 5, 2012 12:00pm CDT
today's trivia. what is the science of brewing beer called? a. zorology b. zymurgy c. zumology the answer still to come this midday! winning lottery numbers. winning pick 3 numbers. 569 pick 4 winning numbers. 71,9,3 mega millions 36 million dollars. get yourself a ticket.ñóxó÷?÷?@?@? ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected for people over 50. pro-health for life is a toothpaste that defends against tender, inflamed gums sensitivity and weak enamel. conditions people over 50 experience. crest pro-health for life. so jill can keep living the good life. crest. life opens up when you do. a new study found that free birth control may dramatically reduce the number of teen pregnanices and abortions. the study looked at more than nine thousand girls and women at risk for unintended pregnancy in the saint louis area. researchers found over three years, that both abortions and teen births were much lower than the national rate. they also found that
NBC
Oct 3, 2012 11:00pm PDT
of political science students. the president's own staff tonight said romney won the debate when it came to style points gop the students there agree? >> for the most part, yes, they do agree. about 120 political sciences students came here to watch the debate along with some professors and some alumni. the general consensus was romney had a slight edge over the president in terms of his performance at the debate tonight. >> two rebuild america. >> more effective. more charismatic. >> i will lower taxes on middle income families. >> governor romney held his own. actually, i was surprised. >> reporter: after the debate was over, even some of the president's biggest supporters in the room felt that romney had won. >> romney did a great job in presenting himself in like a very positive way. even though, like, the answers that obama gave were very pro democratic, pro public education. >> overall, romney, from my perspective, did a little bit better. he wasn't as specific as obama, but he set out to attack obama more. >> this way it's his do or die moment. >> reporter: melinda jackson sa
CNN
Oct 4, 2012 12:00am PDT
we train teachers, and i want to hire another 100,000 new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree our corporate tax rate is too high, i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking it down to 25%, but i also want to close those loopholes that are giving incentives for companies that are shipping jobs overseas, i want to provide tax breaks for companies that are here in the united states, on energy, governor romney and i, we both agree we have to boost american energy production and oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years, but i also believe that we have to look at the energy sources of the future like wind, solar, biofeels, and make those investments, so all of this is possible. now, in order for to us do it, we have to close our deficit, and one of the things we've been discussing tonight, how do we
NBC
Oct 4, 2012 5:00am PDT
-- political science professor jim cottrell joins us. thanks for getting up early with us. jim, a lot going on last night. romney was the aggressor, president obama doing a little rope-a-dope there. in your mind what kind of grade would you give these candidates. >> i'd have to say romney probably felt like he earned an "a." he seemed confident and assertive. one of the key things is he wanted to reassure voters he understood their problems and he from the outset from his initial statement, i think he did a pretty good job of suggesting that. he cared about jobs and the economy and probably passed the test of reassuring voters that he did understand the problems that we're facing. >> and now we are, what, 12 days away until the next debate. professor, what do the two candidates need to do between now and that next date on the 16th? >> well, i think obama needs to become a little bit more assertive, a little bit more aggressive. as the front runner, i believe he felt like he could just sort of coast a little bit and as the front runner not make any mistakes and perhaps maybe romney wou
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00am EDT
antonio mendez hosing as a hollywood producer scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american
LINKTV
Oct 8, 2012 8:00am PDT
tribunal. on sunday, palestinian history and political science professors aleh -- saleh hamayel. >> whenever a colonial settler situation never used the natives as their force, their fate was always genocide. total, physical extermination. now that was not easy to do in the middle of the 20th-century. fortunately for us, the done is to project came in 1948. it was too late to duplicate what happened for the indians of north america. >> your response, dennis banks, to the palestinian political science professor? >> i think -- his presence is very strong. i listened intently to what he was saying. after we had a chance to look at the comparisons of this happening in palestine now as to what happened with us during the 1930's and 1940's. it is the same pattern. i said that on the very first day when this -- what is happening to those people is what we went through during the last century. it is, unfortunately, it is the same people. it is the u.s. government with funneled money to israel and then it goes to hurt the palestinian people. >> dennis banks, thank you for being with us t
LINKTV
Oct 3, 2012 8:00am PDT
? let's suppose we take those flippers and cut them off. [laughter] it's for science. all right? all right. now it could take the tail on to it, right? all right. we cut the tail off. with the eyeballs. okay. now, oh let's suppose we-- that's a little cruel. let's suppose we just take the flippers and put scotch tape over them, okay, and put a couple of splints in the tail. okay. now, how can the fish go down if it wants to go down? how many say, "it can't do anything now, got no flippers"? how many say, "i think the fish still can go down"? here's a little hint. if the fish is gonna go down, what does the fish have to do to its density, make it more or less? more. is there any way for the fish to change its density? yes. what can it do? breathes off the air. it can contract its--bladder. it can make its volume smaller. if it pulls in on its bladder, pulls in, it'll sink, okay? and so the-- let's suppose, all of a sudden, you put better food at the top. how's it gonna get to the top? it's gonna push out. push out, make the volume larger and it's gonna go right to the top. so a fish varies
FOX
Oct 5, 2012 10:00pm PDT
the first human rabies death in 20 years. our health and science center tells us how a single bat could have put dozens of people all over the world at risk. >>> it happened somewhere in south contracosta county. colonies of mexican free tail bats.. >> once symptoms develop it's fatal. >> after a bite the incubation phase is 2 to 6 months. >> the unidentified 34-year-old man was outside with friends who had found a bat quote flopping on the ground. one of them had the bat in a plastic bag. >> the i can't who died of rabys went over and stuck his hand in the bag and most likely was bitten. . >> he never reported the bite in march. took civilian work in iraq and became infectious. he flew home to kran traffic costa june 14th. four days later to bangkok for vacation. flew back to work in iraq. worsened. flew to dubai for treatment . >> there were 59 people who were identified and 23 of those people internationally received post exposure. >> the man's family also got shots. they urge people to avoid all contact with wild animals acting usually and all bats. immediate treatment can sav
ABC
Oct 7, 2012 11:00pm PDT
disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the beating cells they began watching them as they gre
CNBC
Oct 2, 2012 6:00pm EDT
machines that rec any previous patterns. inned end, what steams me about the stack market science, is the false sense of security. as we got through the difficult month of september and now we are fine. that is really helpful. until it turns bad, here is the bottom line, the problem with these patterns is that they help until they don't. they give you comfort until there is no reason for it. my advice, ignore the calendar, do the homehomework. a broken stock clock, write twice a day. bill, here is bill. >> cramer from ohio the football hall-of-fame. >> number two belongs but he never made a super bowl so go ahead. >> talking about mpc a company that is poised to take advantage of opportunity crews. >> what do you think? >> i agree. i think it is a terrific situation. they he don't understand about the balkin and the eagle firm. and mpc is a winner in that situation and not a loser. let's go to robyn in california. >> hi, jim. booyah i read that arising christmas shopping is expected this year. mattel or other kid oriented stocks, whether they rise during the holiday season and ba what you
CNBC
Oct 6, 2012 4:00am EDT
exclusive with the ceo of sandstorm gold is next. >>> later, smart speculation, as science and technology converge, ground-breaking developments in medicine continue to emerge. cramer's zeroing in on one biotech spec that could be on the verge of a major move. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." got @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer at #madtweets. send an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. [singing] hoveround takes me where i wanna go... where will it send me... one call to hoveround and you'll be singing too! pick up the phone and call hoveround, the premier power chair. hoveround makes it easier than any other power chair. hoveround is more maneuverable to get you through the tightest doors and hallways. more reliable. hoveround employees build your chair, deliver your chair, and will service your chair for as long as you own your chair. most importantly, 9 out of 10 people got their hoveround for little or no cost. call now for your free dvd and information kit.
FOX News
Oct 8, 2012 12:00pm PDT
very important for making the bet of the science research we can get on the space station. you have to bring in many cases samples, biological and pharmaceutical and material science experiments, they have to return samples to earth. >>trace: it will dock with the international space station on wednesday, stay there for three weeks and it before splashing de pacific ocean. >>shepard: there have been glitches? >>trace: the rocket which carries the capsule into space, it lost an engine on ascent and they had to rely on the other eight engines to get in orbit. nasa is very precise and will certainly want a full account from spacex about what happened. that could delay their next launch which is scheduled for january. spacex says the rockets are designed to be able to lose an engine and keep going. also, glitches happen. >> we will continue to always improve. we will learn from our flights and continue to improve the vehicle. given that we are looking toward flying crew on the vehicles, we want to make sure we address any and all items that we find and learn about it so we can make it m
NBC
Oct 6, 2012 3:00am PDT
exclusive with the ceo of sandstorm gold is next. >>> later, smart speculation, as science and technology converge, ground-breaking developments in medicine continue to emerge. cramer's zeroing in on one biotech speck that could be on the verge of a major move. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." go to @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer at #madtweets. send an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] dayquil doesn't treat that. huh? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus rushes relief to all your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] did you know that the single cap of gain gives as much freshness as a whole bottle of that other stuff? ♪ that's more than enough freshness to go around... unless you happen to be this guy. [ sniffing ] [ male announcer ] you don't want t
CNN
Oct 9, 2012 8:00am PDT
. so it gives you an idea of how massive this balloon is. as far as the science, ashleigh, yes, what they're trying to see is just what the human body does when it travels the speed of sound. if the speed of sound has any affect on the body when it's just traveling in a spacesuit, that's never been done before. felix baum na felix baumgartner is about to do this. another thing they will mesh is how this high pressure suit holds up. if it does hold up and is not compromised in any way, this could be the next generation of spacesuit. those are the technological advances they hope to be able to make here with this mission. you know, just a few months ago i talked to felix baumgartner about this and with all of its inherent risks, and there are many, i asked him a key question, is he afraid of dying on this mission. take a listen. >> well, dying has always been part of my life. as a bait jumper you always face death on every base jump and so it's important you do your homework because you need confidence. you have to have confidence in your team and your skills and yourself and you alway
FOX Business
Oct 9, 2012 1:00pm EDT
take a close look here at edwards life sciences. this is a company that deals a lot with your heart. heart valve therapy, critical care, cardiac surgery, they are cutting their sales outlook for the third quarter. a couple reasons why they are doing this. take a look at the two-day chart. down nearly 20% today. that is a huge move for a company that has had a nice run for the year 2012. they are blaming europe. also, the expected growth here in the u.s. was not what they anticipated. lori: thank you. move over baggage fees, long lines and delays. talking on your cell phone at 10,000 feet. what do you think? next season take a look at some of today's winners and losers. green mountain coffee. up almost 2% on the day. we will be right back. ♪ 0t[h7 [ male announcer ] what if you had thermal night-vision goggles, like in a special opsission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal coateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeti stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. tra
CNBC
Oct 4, 2012 2:00pm EDT
that they're not? >> the knee jerk reaction is science and math. in fact, president obama last night said, hey, i'm going to hire 100,000 more science and math teachers. great, but that's not right. you know, i did some surfing around. i hope you have the graphic. i found the admission test to m.i.t. it looks like the same s.a.t. or a.c.t. test we all took in a algebra and high school. if you look at the date on the test, it's from 1869. what was it back then they wanted kids who knew how to do equations? in 1870, the brooklyn bridge started construction. we're still teaching, 140 years later, the same curriculum to use to build bridges. we don't build bridges anymore. >> they probably adjusted their curriculum to meet demand. it's a shocking concept, right? >> right. >> i guess if i'm hearing you right, to mandy's point, we should be teaching software programming, health care, right? not math for trees and the sport of spectating, whatever the hell that was. >> all the above. you know, the thing in the '50s and '60s, it was about languages. we all wanted our children to aspire to be
NBC
Oct 4, 2012 6:00am PDT
night's debate and that includes a group of political science students from san jose state. they watched that debate together in downtown san jose last night. after it was over, even some of the president's biggest supporters, they were in that room and felt that romney did have a slight edge. >> overall romney, from my perspective, did a little bit better. he wasn't as specific as obama, but he set out to attack obama more. >> the so-called experts telling us romney might get a little bit of a bump in the polls from the debate, but whether that bump actually comes in the all-important swing states where the race is very, very close, that still remains to be seen. coming up at 6:30, we'll be talking about surprises from that debate, including topics that surprisingly did not come up with a political science professor. he'll be here to talk about that. >>> let us just warn you when you head out your front door, it's a little bit colder. a little chill in the air. >> hey, good morning to you. it's actually close to 60 degrees just about everywhere. owe you won't need that jacket this morni
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 4:00pm EDT
cognitive science, and he is cofounder of the new england institute for cognitive science, an evolutionary study. religious studies at the university of very good. he's been an unflagging student of how human beings make their way in the world, even though that way is often not pretty. he challenges each reader to tinker with their own wiring, to be aware, and he hopes to do better. for his profound insights into the human condition and into the conditions, some humans play some others, we present him the anisfield-wolf book award for nonfiction. [applause] ♪ the night this is wonderful and i deeply appreciate the fact that such a distinguished jury read my book, much less thought it worthy of this great honor. in a moment i am going to read you an excerpt from "less than human," which deals the course of the atrocities of the past. but i think it is useful to remind ourselves that the plaintiff considering atrocities that the path is to make a better future. if we can understand what has driven us to do the terrible thing we've done to our fellow human beings, perhaps we can fashion the
Current
Oct 8, 2012 6:00am PDT
science. >> stephanie: yeah, you sometimes think it's an onion headline. brown respect of georgia. all of the stuff i was taught about evolution, the big bang is theory, all of that is lies straight from the pit of hell and it's lies to try to keep me and all of the folks that were taught right by thinking they need a savior. this is the man in 2007 who said he didn't believe president obama is an american citizen. and i bet he is a job truther as well. >> yeah, they would have quotation marks around science. >> stephanie: yeah. david, good morning. >> caller: i saw something great the other day on randi rhodes one of her things on facebook. hey, mitt today's sesame street is brought to you by the number 7.8. [ laughter ] >> caller: if we're going to massage the numbers, why don't make it 5.5. >> great point. >> caller: thank you. >> stephanie: the number 7.8, brought to you by the letters f u. rude pundit has some great stuff on all of this as we continue on the "stephanie miller show." ♪ p in congress. it won't do anything for the budget. he just wanted to strip their collecti
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 12:00pm EDT
public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much more cre
FOX News
Oct 7, 2012 11:00am EDT
rotors sort this out. >> >> eric: as haley barbour is fond of saying, it is not rocket science, voters want mitt romney to convince them that that he has a plan to make america recover faster than president obama and that his policies will improve the lives of all americans over the next four years. he is effective when he draws contrasts between the president's failed policies and when he would do differently and reinforcing it saying, i am a principled, but practical candidate, i am willing to work across party lines to fix america's most pressing problems. >> eric: julie, what does the president need to do to bounce back? >> what he has been doing all along, you saw him leading in the polls because the president's campaign has been incredibly effective in the swig -- swing state, convincing voters that mitt romney shouldn't be trusted and nothing in romney's record as governor of massachusetts or bain capital would reflect well in the presidency. look, i will be the first to say, he bombed that debate. it was abysmal. it was a really horrible performance. there are a few more left.
CNBC
Oct 5, 2012 11:00pm EDT
exclusive with the ceo of sandstorm gold is next. >>> later, smart speculation, as science and technology converge, ground-breaking developments in medicine continue to emerge. cramer's zeroing in on one biotech speck that could be on the verge of a major move. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." go to @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer at #madtweets. send an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. i don't spend money on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ >>> i'm always telling you you need to own some gold. that's been real good advice, given the tremendous breakout the pr
NBC
Oct 4, 2012 5:30pm PDT
, especially boys. a report from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: jenna, like many moms, worries about producting her young kids from chemical contamination. especially the effects of the the chemical, bpa, found in plastics. >> i'm avoiding plastic in general. we try to drink out of glass. all of our water bottles, we take away with us, are reuseable. they're glass or metal. >> reporter: a new study suggests that moms may be passing along effects of bpa to their kids. in a study of 500 pregnant women, those with the highest levels of bpa have lower thyroid levels. and so did their infant sons. why only boys? scientists aren't sure. but they see the same thing in animal studies. thyroid hormones help control many systems in the body and can affect childhood development. >> if bpa is affecting the levels during pregnancy, this could be affecting the learning, memory and behavior of children later in life. >> reporter: bpa is part of many widely used plastic products. including can liners in certain bottles. most americans have trace amounts in their body.
WHUT
Oct 4, 2012 8:00am EDT
science, that what republicans want to do is they want to make the 2012 electorate look more like the 2010 electorate and the 2008 electorate. and clinton said he had never seen in his lifetime an effort to restrict the franchise that he has seen today. clinton grew up in arkansas. he knows what this kind of politics is about. he was there. he knew people there during segregation. i think for him it is a very, very disturbing to be going back to such a place, to be having the kind of conversations we are having now that you would have before the civil rights act of 1964 was passed and before the voting rights act. . tavis: is this a short-term strategy or long term? is this a strategy to get rid of barack obama, the first african american president? or is this a strategy they think it can win long-term for them, the strategy of voter suppression? >> i think they are playing a short-term game. it is not just about president obama but holding power every level of the electoral process. but i think what they are betting now is that some of these demographic changes are still in their
ABC
Oct 3, 2012 4:00am EDT
. >> reporter: hitting the fast food drive-in for science. >> can i get five soft tacos? can i get a number four? >> reporter: over and over and over again, it has been dave giocolo's life the past few months or so. as has been eating the food. a precisely calculated 1,000 calories a day. how many calories? 770. >> reporter: this man is paying them to. dr. samuel klein is a researcher at washington university in st. louis. trying to understand why fast food leads to weight gain and diseases like diabetes and hypertension. at some point, though, research on rats alone is not enough. somebody has to eat the food? >> someone has to do it. >> reporter: and so, a radio ad, that offered a cash incentive, up to $3,500, depending on how long it would take. >> i called right away. >> reporter: so did nurse, dawn freeman. >> it took a month. >> reporter: to get approved? >> to get approved. >> reporter: so, they ate every day, from one of these five restaurants, until their weight went up 5% or 6%. dawn, in eight weeks went from 170 to 186. doesn't look like a lot. but here's how it felt. >> f
SFGTV2
Oct 7, 2012 6:30pm PDT
using science to guide where to use our police resources. we need to look at our transportation system and revolutionize that. that will improve a lot of things, public health, public safety, commerce. so we need to be looking with a vision for the future about what we want our city to be. and i think i have done that before and like i said, i'm for prevention. and i'm for looking to the future and figuring out how we can sculpt a better san francisco and that is what i will do as supervisor. thank you, mr. davis. i want to remind folks and point out that we have seen a disturbing trend in san francisco over the past couple ever years. of years. we have had a lot of leadership appointed for us. an appointed mayor, appointed district attorney when our leaders are chosen for us instead of by us. if you want leadership in our city, i'll i'm your candidate. at juliandavis.org, there is more detail about the grassroots campaign we're building. i encourage you to look where the candidates are getting their money from. i think it says a lot about whose interests they will be representing. tha
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